Libri in inglese

 

Palace of wonders Venice. History of the palaces, families and events that shaped the insula of St Moisè di Elsa Gregory – Supernova – 2020 € 15.00

Opposite the Customs and The Salute Church  stands the insula of St Moise’ from where in the Middle Ages pilgrims and knights were sailing for the crusades. Here starts the Architectural Historical and Literature analyses of the area: ancient palaces and their families intermingled with the history of the fabulous Grand Hotel Britannia managed by Carlo Walther, the true first pioneer of electricity in Venice; the hotel celebrities and historical clients that enlightened Venice with their stories takes us from the Belle Époque until today to this enchanted spot where now stands the St Regis Venice Hotel.

Barracoon di Hurston Zora Neale – Harper Collins Publ. USA – 2020 € 12.50

In 1927, Zora Neale Hurston went to Plateau, Alabama, just outside Mobile, to interview eighty-six-year-old Cudjo Lewis. Of the millions of men, women, and children transported from Africa to America as slaves, Cudjo was then the only person alive to tell the story of this integral part of the nation’s history. Hurston was there to record Cudjo’s firsthand account of the raid that led to his capture and bondage fifty years after the Atlantic slave trade was outlawed in the United States. In 1931, Hurston returned to Plateau, the African-centric community three miles from Mobile founded by Cudjo and other former slaves from his ship. Spending more than three months there, she talked in depth with Cudjo about the details of his life. During those weeks, the young writer and the elderly formerly enslaved man ate peaches and watermelon that grew in the backyard and talked about Cudjo’s past―memories from his childhood in Africa, the horrors of being captured and held in a barracoon for selection by American slavers, the harrowing experience of the Middle Passage packed with more than 100 other souls aboard the Clotilda, and the years he spent in slavery until the end of the Civil War. Based on those interviews, featuring Cudjo’s unique vernacular, and written from Hurston’s perspective with the compassion and singular style that have made her one of the preeminent American authors of the twentieth-century, Barracoon masterfully illustrates the tragedy of slavery and of one life forever defined by it. Offering insight into the pernicious legacy that continues to haunt us all, black and white, this poignant and powerful work is an invaluable contribution to our shared history and culture.

The hoarder di Jess Kidd – Canongate Books Ltd – 01/2020 € 12.5

The mesmerising second novel from Jess Kidd, featured on BBC Radio 2 Book Club. A ‘dark, comical tale of haunting and hoarding . . . Brilliant’ The Times
Big Sky by Kate Atkinson Transworld Publishers Ltd, 2020 €11.00
 ‘Big Sky is laced with Atkinson’s sharp, dry humour, and one of the joys of the Brodie novels has always been that they are so funny’ (Observer) Jackson Brodie has relocated to a quiet seaside village in North Yorkshire, in the occasional company of his recalcitrant teenage son Nathan and ageing Labrador Dido, both at the discretion of his former partner Julia. It’s a picturesque setting, but there’s something darker lurking behind the scenes. Jackson’s current job, gathering proof of an unfaithful husband for his suspicious wife, seems straightforward, but a chance encounter with a desperate man on a crumbling cliff leads him into a sinister network-and back into the path of someone from his past. Old secrets and new lies intersect in this breathtaking new literary crime novel, both sharply funny and achingly sad, by one of the most dazzling and surprising writers at work today.

Hush Hush: (Harriet Blue 4) by James Patterson, Candice Fox Cornerstone, 2020 € 11.00
Harriet Blue used to be a detective. Now she’s inmate 3329. Prison is a dangerous place for a former cop – as Harriet Blue is learning on a daily basis. So, following a fight for her life and a prison-wide lockdown, the last person she wants to see is Deputy Police Commissioner Joe Woods. The man who put her inside. But Woods is not there to gloat. His daughter Tonya and her two-year-old child have gone missing. He’s ready to offer Harriet a deal: find his family to buy her freedom…

How to be a Fascist: A Manual Michela Murgia
Pushkin Press, 2020 € 11,25
Democracy is difficult, flawed and unstable. It involves barely distinguishable political parties taking part in lengthy, overcomplicated and expensive decision-making processes. Trying to engage so many people with political issues seems to lead only to complexity and disagreement. So why bother? Doesn’t fascism guarantee a more effective and efficient management of the state? In this short, bitingly ironic book, Michela Murgia explores the logic that is attracting increasing numbers of voters to right-wing populism. Ending with a ‘fascistometer’ to measure the reader’s own authoritarian inclinations, How to be a Fascist is a refreshingly direct, polemical book that asks us to confront the fascist in our governments, in our societies and in our own minds.

Agency di Gibson William – Penguin LCC US – 2020 € 17.75

“ONE OF THE MOST VISIONARY, ORIGINAL, AND QUIETLY INFLUENTIAL WRITERS CURRENTLY WORKING”* returns with a sharply imagined follow-up to the New York Times bestselling novel The Peripheral. William Gibson has trained his eye on the future for decades, ever since coining the term “cyberspace” and then popularizing it in his classic speculative novel Neuromancer in the early 1980s. Cory Doctorow raved that The Peripheral is “spectacular, a piece of trenchant, far-future speculation that features all the eyeball kicks of Neuromancer.” Now Gibson is back with Agency-a science fiction thriller heavily influenced by our most current events. Verity Jane, gifted app whisperer, takes a job as the beta tester for a new product: a digital assistant, accessed through a pair of ordinary-looking glasses. “Eunice,” the disarmingly human AI in the glasses, manifests a face, a fragmentary past, and a canny grasp of combat strategy. Realizing that her cryptic new employers don’t yet know how powerful and valuable Eunice is, Verity instinctively decides that it’s best they don’t. Meanwhile, a century ahead in London, in a different time line entirely, Wilf Netherton works amid plutocrats and plunderers, survivors of the slow and steady apocalypse known as the jackpot. His boss, the enigmatic Ainsley Lowbeer, can look into alternate pasts and nudge their ultimate directions. Verity and Eunice are her current project. Wilf can see what Verity and Eunice can’t: their own version of the jackpot, just around the corner, and the roles they both may play in it. *The Boston Globe
Bleak house di Charles Dickens – Pan Macmillan – 2020 € 15.50
Dickens’ famous satirical novel about family greed and corruption in the British court system, with an afterword by David Stuart Davies and original illustrations by H. K. Browne.

One good deed di Baldacci David- Pan Macmillan Paperbacks -2020 € 8.50

1 New York Times bestselling author David Baldacci returns with his next blockbuster
February’s son di Alan Parks , Blackthorn Books – 2020  € 8.50
ON DARK NIGHTS, SOMEONE NEEDS TO LIGHT A FEW FIRES . . . Bodies are piling up with messages carved into their chests. Rival gangs are competing for control. New drugs have arrived in Glasgow, and they’ve brought a different kind of violence to the broken city. The law of the street is changing and demons from Detective McCoy’s past are coming back to haunt him. Can McCoy keep his head up for long enough to deliver justice?
All the Rage di Hunter Cara – Penguin Books Ltd (UK) – 2020 € 11.00
Here, as before, lies the battlefield of the heart, where characters who have suffered disaffection, alienation or emotional damage somehow emerge – haltingly, awkwardly – into the astonishment of intimacy. And here, too, are the ones who will not shake off the hurt and the loss, who will not come through. The extraordinary title story takes place on a railway platform, with a couple waiting for a train that never comes, and opens out into the husband’s shocking admission of years of deceit, and a devastating portrait of a failed marriage, a failed man. Another story shows a woman who is, in every sense, lost and who finds herself – to her bewilderment and alarm – walking the aisles of a sex emporium holding an electric penis. There is great compassion here, and deep, dark humour, but also a stronger sense than ever before that the emotional paralysis can be loosened – that an impossibly uncomfortable lunch, say, between two apparent strangers, can culminate in a passionate kiss. ‘You do not know this man. He is practically a stranger. Only he’s not.’

All that’s dead di Stuart MacBride – Harpercollins Publishers – 2020 € 9.75

An Englishman, who lectures at Aberdeen University, goes missing, with only spattered blood stains to indicate what might have happened. He was vociferous in his Unionism (especially on social media) and it is thought by Police Scotland that the Alt-Nats (Alternative Nationalists) have kidnapped him. Then at least two others go missing too. Amidst all this, Detective Inspector Logan McRae is back at work after having had a year off on sick leave (on account of his wounds from the last story The Blood Road). McRae, who is still in Professional Standards, is seconded to the investigation into the disappearances when it is revealed that the detective inspector leading the investigation, was in a Nationalist terror group when he was sixteen.[
The perfect wife di J.P. Delaney, Quercus 2020  € 9.50
Abbie awakens in a daze with no memory of who she is or how she landed in this unsettling condition. The man by her side claims to be her husband. He’s a titan of the tech world, the founder of one of Silicon Valley’s most innovative start-ups. He tells Abbie that she is a gifted artist, an avid surfer, a loving mother to their young son, and the perfect wife. He says she had a terrible accident five years ago and that, through a huge technological breakthrough, she has been brought back from the abyss…
The Housing Lark di Selvon Sam – Penguin GROUP – 2020 € 14.25
The humorous yet poignant novel of West Indian migrant life in London that adds an iconic voice to the growing Caribbean canonA Penguin ClassicSet in London in the 1960’s, when the UK encouraged its Commonwealth citizens to emigrate as a result of the post-war labor shortage, The Housing Lark explores the Caribbean migrant experience in the “Mother Country” by following a group of friends as they attempt to buy a home together. Despite encountering a racist and predatory rental market, the friends scheme, often comically, to find a literal and figurative place of their own. Will these motley folks, male and female, Black and Indian, from Trinidad and Jamaica, dreamers, hustlers, and artists, be able to achieve this milestone of upward mobility? Unique and wonderful, comic and serious, cynical and tenderhearted, The Housing Lark poses the question of whether their “lark,” or quixotic idea of finding a home, can ever become a reality. Kittitian-British novelist and playwright Caryl Phillips contributes a foreword, while postcolonial literature scholar Dohra Ahmad provides a contextual introduction.
Cold comfort farm di Stella Gibbons – Penguin Books Ltd – 2020 € 11.25
‘We are not like other folk, maybe, but there have always been Starkadders at Cold Comfort Farm…’ Sensible, sophisticated Flora Poste has been expensively educated to do everything but earn a living. When she is orphaned at twenty, she decides her only option is to descend on relatives – the doomed Starkadders at the aptly named Cold Comfort Farm. There is Judith in a scarlet shawl, heaving with remorse for an unspoken wickedness; raving old Ada Doom, who once saw something nasty in the woodshed; lustful Seth and despairing Reuben, Judith’s two sons; and there is Amos, preaching fire and damnation to one and all.
Another planet di Tracey Thorn, Canongate Books – 2020  € 14,00
‘Tender, wise and funny’ SUNDAY EXPRESS ‘Beautifully observed, deadly funny’ MAX PORTER Before becoming an acclaimed musician and writer, Tracey Thorn was a typical teenager: bored and cynical, despairing of her aspirational parents. Her only comfort came from house parties and the female pop icons who hinted at a new kind of living. Returning to the scene of her childhood, Thorn takes us beyond the bus shelters, the pub car parks and the weekly discos, to the parents who wanted so much for their children and the children who wanted none of it. With great wit and insight, Thorn reconsiders the Green Belt post-war dream so many artists have mocked, and yet so many artists have come from.